Portfolio

WRITING & PRESENTATIONS


DIGITAL EXPERIENCES & CAMPAIGNS

The first program from Made By Us, My Wish For U.S. invites your hopes and dreams for the future of the United States. It was the first program officially recognized by America250, the U.S. Semiquincentennial Commission coordinating the largest, most inclusive commemoration of U.S. history yet – our 250th anniversary in 2026. We also teamed up with First Book to donate 45,000 books to Title 1 teachers who shared their wish.

This crowdsourced map reveals 500+ cultural institutions worldwide that are documenting and collecting stories and memories around COVID-19. A collaboration between Made By Us and the International Federation for Public History.

In an age of fervent debate around who and what should be memorialized by statues, monuments and plaques, The Atlas of Southern Memory presents a prototype for a platform that can enable broader participation, annotation, and exploration in “what gets remembered.” Read more. My graduate thesis project was funded in part by a grant from the NULab for Texts, Maps and Networks.

The American Civic Collaboration Awards, or Civvys, celebrates civic collaborative efforts at the local, regional and national level. I developed and managed these annual awards with the Bridge Alliance, Big Tent Nation and the National Conference on Citizenship from 2016-2019.


EXHIBITIONS & PUBLIC PROGRAMS

The Polaroid Project at MIT Museum | Exhibition Project Manager

LEFT: History of Kendall Square “Phone Booth” Interactive Exhibit | Project Manager + All Audio Content
RIGHT: In Motion at MIT Museum | Exhibition Project Manager

STATES OF INCARCERATION at Northeastern University | Project manager, panel creation, marketing

USD Conversations: “The Impact of Misinformation on American Democracy, Past and Present” (Moderator)

For Freedoms, Made By Us, JANM and MOCA: “GOTV: The Role of the Artist” with Glenn Kaino, Kristina Wong, Claudia Peña (Moderator)


OLDER WORK

SISTORY is a passion project, a history blog and newsletter I ran for several years with my two sisters, featuring weekly posts connecting history with pop culture for Millennial women. Some post selections are below.

Rest in Power: Three Sisters, the Graveyard Shift and the Supreme Court

The girls built a one-room shack on the cemetery grounds and lived in it 24/7, guarding the property with shotguns. They put up a sign that said “Trespass at Your Own Peril.”

Liquor Ladies, Bootlegging Queens

When alcohol was outlawed in 1920, women more often than men stepped up to (literally) serve. Meet some of these queens in this interactive map.

Welcome South, Brother: How a Radio Station Put Georgia on the Map

In 1922, Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Chicago had wide-ranging radio broadcast stations; Atlanta, the foremost Southern city, did not, representing a void for the whole region.

The Brooklyn Bridge

Raindrop. Drop top. She built a bridge when her man stopped. How Emily Roebling stepped up and built. that. bridge.

The Star-Shmangled Banner

How’d we get stuck with this national anthem? Turns out, we had our chance to change it. In 1861, the Committee Upon the National Hymn was formed to find a new national anthem. They were not successful.

She-Merchants: Sell Goods, Get Money, Be Beholden to No Man

Boston’s 18th-century businesswomen left their significant estates to other women.

THE PAST IS FEMALE, TOO
We all know “The Future is Female.” And though women have often been left out of the narrative, we know “The Past is Female Too.” Sistory launched this popular campaign of content and t-shirts.

Radical Silence: The Story of WGTB-FM is a mini-documentary sharing the eventful life of Georgetown’s radio station from its massive reach and impact, radical content and eventual sale.

NEWS LITERACY, INFORMED CITIZENS & CONSUMER-DRIVEN MEDIA. For my undergraduate American Studies thesis, I evaluated programs and drafted solutions to empower a news-literate public that would demand high-quality journalism.

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